Facebook “Community Standards”

A couple of things which apparently have violated Facebook’s “Community Standards” recently. Firstly, the idea of loving your enemies:


Secondly, a post encouraging people to correctly use the word “homophobia”:


Seems like the “community standards” process is being abused somewhat…

Mozilla Strategy and Vision

Not sure if I wasn’t paying enough attention, but I entirely missed the “Mozilla Strategy Articulation and 2016 Topline Targets” session from two weeks ago, recorded on Air Mozilla. This was the start of the 2016 planning process, where Chris Beard outlines our mission and 5-year vision. It should be required viewing for everyone interested in where Mozilla is or should be going in 2016, and in the next 5 years. We are planning for 2016 now; your input is welcomed.

What Does A Simple Phone for Old People Look Like? A Tablet

Ahmed Nefzaoui’s blog post about RTL languages introduced me to this awesome video, which is funny, charming, poignant and incidentally makes great points about phone usability:

It got me thinking: what would a phone for someone like Dotty look like? The more I thought about it, the more I realised the answer is “a tablet”.

Imagine a 7″ tablet with 4G phone hardware, so it has an always-on, fast, low-latency Internet connection. It is nice and big, and so easily held and viewed, and the screen controls can be made bigger for those with poor eyesight. It has no fiddly close-together hardware buttons to push. It can be unlocked with a simple swipe. You don’t have to know which is the menu button, which is *, or deal with T9 predictive text input. It has twin directional mics and speakers, with echo cancellation, so it doesn’t need to be held to the ear and the speaker positioned accurately. It has a built-in stand, so it can be placed at a good angle for calls on any flat surface. It has a camera for video calls, which (given sufficient bandwidth and frame rate) also allows for lip reading. It can record, and then email or MMS, short voice clips, which are much easier to create than text messages. It has wireless charging (or perhaps a dock) to avoid having to connect fiddly micro USB cables. One day, it might have voice recognition and speech-to-text, but perhaps not today. And it’s still small enough to fit in a handbag on the rare occasions it needs to go somewhere.

Thinking of all the advantages… why would anyone build a phone for old people in a mobile phone form factor?

Competition: The Mozilla Manifesto Principles in Simple Words

Randall Munroe of XKCD has written a whole book which explains things using only simple words. It’s called “Thing Explainer“. He’s also written a writing checker for people who want to write more things like that.

I am asking everyone to see if they can write the ten key points of the Mozilla Manifesto in a new way, saying the same things but using only simple words which his checker likes (like this writing that you are reading does).

You are allowed to use “Internet” even though it’s not a simple word, but if you find a way to not use “Internet”, that’s even better. You are also allowed to use “Mozilla” in the heading at the top, which will be “Mozilla Manifesto” but using only simple words.

It’s probably best if you put up your writing somewhere else on the Internet and then add some information here to say where it is. But if that’s a problem for you, you can put your writing here instead.

The person who makes the best writing will get something. I don’t know what yet. But making the best writing should make you happy anyway.

If you think this is a good and fun idea, then please tell everyone you know (in a nice way) so they can try as well.

I hope everything goes very well for you in this.

Top 50 DOS Problems Solved: Recursive Delete

Q: What is the quickest way to delete all the files in a sub-directory, plus all the files in any sub-directories inside it, and so on as deep as directories go, along with the sub-directories themselves? In other words how do you delete an entire branch of sub-directories within sub-directories without typing a lot of DEL, CD and RD commands?

A: There is no easy way for DOS to do this unassisted. The nearest any version comes is DR DOS which can delete the files, but not remove the sub-directories themselves. The relevant command is:

XDEL *.* /S

No version of MS-DOS can automatically delete files in sub-directories. To do the job in its entirety you need a third-party tree pruning utility. You can often find these in PD/shareware libraries. Alternatively, commercial disk utilities such as Xtree will do it.

Leaving aside the amazingness of not having recursive delete, I wonder why the DR-DOS folk decided to produce a command which removed the files but not the directories?

10 Reasons Not To Use Open Source

I was browsing the Serena website today, and came across a white paper: “Time to harden the SDLC. Open Source: does it still make sense? (10 reasons enterprises are changing their policies)”. You are required to supply personal information to download a copy, and they force this by only providing the link by email. However, intrigued, I requested one.

Apparently, enterprises are questioning their use of Open Source software (presumably in the specific area of software development) because:

  1. Terrorists
  2. Chinese hackers stealing things
  3. Chinese hackers changing things
  4. There is no support
  5. Ransomware
  6. Man-in-the-middle attacks
  7. Local copies of source code are easy to steal
  8. Edward Snowden
  9. 0-days
  10. Git is hard to use (I’ll give them this one)

The list ends with this wonderfully inconsistent paragraph:

All of this seems very alarmist: what is the true situation? The truth is no one really knows because no one is talking about it. There is a clear, present and obvious danger from using open source solutions in support of your technology stack. You have to decide if the risk is worth it.

No-one really knows, but there’s a clear, present and obvious danger? I see. The only clear, present and obvious danger demonstrated here is the one that git is posing to Serena’s business…

Kickstarter: Open Source Voice Control Box

This looks like fun – it’s Mycroft, an “open source AI” (basically, Siri, Cortana, Google Now etc). It would be even better if they did the language processing locally, but at least if it’s open source you can see what it is doing. There’s a stretch goal of $125k for Linux desktop control, which would be very cool. The drive closes in six days, and they still need $10,000 or so to hit their goal. Back it today; I have :-)

Top 50 DOS Problems Solved: Sorting Directory Listings

Q: Could you tell me if it’s possible to make the DIR command list files in alphabetical order?

A: Earlier versions of DOS didn’t allow this but there’s a way round it. MS-DOS 5 gives you an /ON switch to use with DIR, for instance:


would list all the files with names ending in .TXT, pause the listing every screenful (/P) and sort the names into alphabetical order (/ON).

Users of earlier DOS programs can shove the output from DIR through a utility program that sorts the listing before printing it on the screen. That utility is SORT.EXE, supplied with DOS. … [So:]


diverts the output from DIR into SORT, which sorts the directory listing and sends it to the screen. Put this in a batch file called SDIR.BAT and you will have a sorted directory command called SDIR.

I guess earlier versions of DIR followed the Unix philosophy of “do one thing”…

Wall Street Journal Supports Google’s Dominance of the Content Industry

Compare and contrast: a Wall Street Journal article linked directly, and one reached via Google (click the top link in the search results). The former leads to a preview and a paywall (or, at least, a signupwall), the latter does not.

The press are so concerned about the dominance of Google, at least in Europe, that they are making various (also foot-shooting) moves to try and bring in ancillary copyright. So why, I wonder, is the WSJ enhancing that dominance by privileging Google users over other users in terms of access to their content?

Top 50 DOS Problems Solved: Num Lock

Q: Ever since I moved up from my old Amstrad 1512 to a 386 I have been annoyed by the way Num Lock comes on when the PC is started up or re-booted. I still use the numeric keypad in preference to the additional cursor key block. Is there any way Num Lock can be turned off automatically?

A: As far as I know, not even the latest version of DOS allows you to set the state of Num Lock on start-up. However, there is a short program you can create which, when run from AUTOEXEC.BAT, turns Num Lock off. Depending on whether you use MS-DOS or DR DOS, type one of the listings shown here into a text editor and save it as a plain ASCII file called NUMOFF.LST.

MS-DOS (Debug) version:

INT 21


Then type:


All being well, you will now have a program called NUMOFF.COM. Test it by pressing Num Lock to bring the keyboard light on, and type NUMOFF. The light should go off.

30 years later, this still isn’t trivial in GNOME… But the book authors get kudos for creativity in finding out how to send someone a working and useful binary via the medium of dead trees.

Top 50 DOS Problems Solved: Squashing Files

Q: I post files containing DTP pages and graphics on floppy disks to a bureau for printing. Recently I produced a file that was too big to fit on the disk and I know that I will be producing more in the future. What’s the best way round the problem?

A. There are a number of solutions, most of them expensive. For example, both you and the bureau could buy modems. A modem is a device that allows computers to be connected via a phone line. You would need software, known as a comms program, to go with the modems. This will allow direct PC-to-PC transfer of files without the need for floppy disks. Since your files are so large, you would need a fast 9600 baud modem [Ed: approx 1 kilobyte per second] with MNP5 compression/error correction to make this a viable option.

In this case, however, I would get hold of a utility program called LHA which is widely available from the shareware/PD libraries that advertise in PC Answers. In earlier incarnations it was known as LHarc. LHA enables you to squash files into less space than they occupied before.

The degree of compression depends on the nature of the file. Graphics and text work best, so for you this is a likely solution. The bureau will need a copy of LHA to un-squash the files before it can use them, or you can use LHA in a special way that makes the compressed files self-unpacking.

LHA has a great advantage over rival utilities in that the author allows you to use it for free. There is no registration fee, as with the similar shareware program PKZip, for example.

Every time they brought out a new, larger hard disk, they used to predict the end of the need for compression…