Mozilla’s Root Store Housekeeping Program Bears Fruit

Just over a year ago, in bug 1145270, we removed the root certificate of e-Guven (Elektronik Bilgi Guvenligi A.S.), a Turkish CA, because their audits were out of date. This is part of a larger program we have to make sure all the roots in our program have current audits and are in other ways properly included.

Now, we find that e-Guven has contrived to issue an X509 v1 certificate to one of their customers.

The latest version of the certificate standard X509 is v3, which has been in use since at least the last millennium. So this is ancient magic and requires spelunking in old, crufty RFCs that don’t use current terminology but as far as I can understand it, whether a certificate is a CA certificate or an end-entity certificate in X509v1 is down to client convention – there’s no way of saying so in the certificate. In other words, they’ve accidentally issued a CA certificate to one of their customers, much like TurkTrust did. This certificate could itself issue certificates, and they would be trusted in some subset of clients.

But not Firefox, fortunately, thanks to the hard work of Kathleen Wilson, the CA Certificates module owner. Neither current Firefox nor the current or previous ESR trust this root any more. If they had, we would have had to go into full misissuance mode. (This is less stressful than it used to be due to the existence of OneCRL, our system for pushing revocations out, but it’s still good to avoid.)

Now, we aren’t going to prevent all misissuance problems by removing old CAs, but there’s still a nice warm feeling when you avoid a problem due to forward-looking preventative action. So well done Kathleen.

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